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Chenrezig or Avalokiteshvara Thangka
Chenrezig or Avalokiteshvara Thangka
Chenrezig or Avalokiteshvara Thangka
Chenrezig or Avalokiteshvara Thangka
Chenrezig or Avalokiteshvara Thangka
Chenrezig or Avalokiteshvara Thangka

Chenrezig or Avalokiteshvara Thangka

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$300.00
Sale price
$300.00
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Chenrezig or Avalokiteshvara Thangka

Hand painted on cotton canvas by master thangka artists located in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal.

Painted colour has been made by crush stone and vegetable pigments with gold detail.

Cotton canvas art allows to be mounted in western-style frame or set in coloured brocade in traditional style (contact us at tibetanemporium@mail.com for further information on brocade setting)

Description:

LOKESHWOR / Avalokitesvara (Sanskrit) Chenrezig (Tibetan)

Lokeshwor means the Lord who looks down toward the entire realm with compassion. Lokeshwor is variably depicted, described and portrayed differently in different cultures and countries as either a male or a female Buddhist deity.

This exquisite and one-of-a-kind Tibetan thangka is hand painted by master artists in the Kathmandu Valley.

On Chenrezig's left side, at the level of his heart, is the gentle face of a wild deer; the deer’s skin is draped over his shoulder.

The deerskin is an ancient symbol of renunciation, as wandering mendicants often took the skin of a deer as a meditation seat, and sometimes as a garment and blanket. This symbolic meaning applies, as Chenrezig, a Bodhisattva, has renounced the snares of worldly existence, but here it further symbolizes his boundless compassion for sentient beings.

According to legend, Chenrezig once took rebirth as a wild deer, but he had such heartfelt compassion for the hunter who chased him that he willingly laid down his life.

Dimensions: (approximate)

68cm x 49cm

Kindly note: Traditional thangka artists do not sign their name on their completed work.

By not doing so, it is a symbol of humility and reluctance to take any merit for the work that they created. Preferably, the artwork is considered as a tribute to the dharma and the deity they create.

Please be aware of the misconception that thangka art is worth more when signed by the artist.